Skip to content ↓
Bradfields Academy

Bradfields Academy

Funding and Grants

Please find below our information regarding the use of DFE allocated funding and grants:

  • Covid Catch-Up Strategy 
  • Primary PE Funding Statement
  • Pupil Premium Funding 
  • Year 7 Catch-Up Funding

Covid Catch-Up Strategy 

The Bradfields Academy Catch-Up strategy is targeted at the whole provision, including all students, subjects and qualifications with equal importance.

The entire staff team at Bradfields along with the students and their families are fully committed to ensuring that the partial school closures and enforced absences have a minimal impact on the students’ learning and well-being.

The strategy is underpinned by both internal and external professional advice, and aims to ensure that every member of the Bradfields community regardless of their particular circumstance, receives the education, opportunities and outcomes they deserve.

The strategy will be supported by investing time and finances on strategies that have proven successful in supporting students with similar profiles to those at Bradfields.

The full strategy report is attached below.

Bradfields Academy Covid Catch-up 2020-21.pdf

Primary PE Funding Statement 

Primary PE Funding

The Department for Education (DfE) provided additional funding for all students in Primary Schools from 2013 onwards.  This is to ensure: all students develop and maintain healthy lifestyles; improved quality and breath of PE and sport; improved attainment in PE; and, increased overall participation rates in PE.

Academy Context

Total number of students eligible for Primary PE funding

2013-14: 21

2014-15: 24

2015-16: 25

2016-17: 23

2017-18: 22

2018-18: 27

2019-20: 31

Amount of PE funding received per student

Schools with 17 or more eligible students receive a lump sum of £16,000 and an additional payment of £10 per student

Total amount of Primary PE funding received

2013-14 £7,715

2014-15  £8,100

2015-16 £8,110

2016-17 £8,115

2017-18: £16,220

2018-19: £16,230

2019-20: £16,310

Schools must use the funding to make additional and sustainable improvements to the quality of their physical education (PE), physical activity and sport.

This means that you should use the premium to:

  • develop or add to the PE, physical activity and sport that your school provides
  • build capacity and capability within the school to ensure that improvements made now will benefit pupils joining the school in future years.

Our Aims:

At Bradfields the PE funding is being used to work towards achieving the following aims:

 2020-21 Objectives

Due to the early closure of schools and restrictions made as a result of Covid-19, any 2019/20 objectives that were not met have been deferred for the new academic year.

  • To continue to achieve the engagement of all pupils in regular physical activity – Chief Medical Officer guidelines recommend that primary school children undertake at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day in the academy by:
    • Maintain the daily ‘6 lap challenge’ for an active start to the Morning.
    • Re-introduce and maintain a ‘Play Leaders’ group to continue to develop ‘active’ playtimes at break and lunchtimes in order to increase physical activity and engagement.
    • Continue to increase opportunities for sensory circuits during the academy day.
  • Increased confidence, knowledge and skills of all staff in teaching PE and sport by:
    • EK and MJC to undertake ‘REAL PE’ and ‘REAL gym’ in order to up-skill their confidence and broaden their knowledge in the delivery of gymnastics and teaching methods of PE.
    • All primary PE teachers to be supported by a Dance company in delivering dance to students focused around the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
  • To continue to increase the number and range of opportunities for primary inter-school competitions.
    • Competing in a range of activities within the local area through ‘Kent School Games’ and ‘Medway Youth Disability Games’.
  • To gain a broader experience of a range of sports and activities offered to all pupils by:
    • Providing additional swimming lessons to all eligible primary students: focused on skill development, sensory needs, self-confidence, socialisation and enjoyment.
    • Research new upcoming sports that could be used in the classroom. Organise a group to attend the academy to lead and support staff in a new sport.
  • To raise the profile of PESSPA across the academy as a tool for whole school improvement by:
    • Re-applying for the afPE Quality Mark Award and successfully reviewing and evaluating the quality of PE and Sport in the academy.

2019-20 Objectives 

  • To achieve the engagement of all pupils in regular physical activity – Chief Medical Officer guidelines recommend that primary school children undertake at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day in school by:
    • Establish and maintain the daily ‘6 lap challenge’ for an active start to the Morning.
    • Create ‘Sport Leaders’ to further develop ‘active’ playtimes at break and lunchtimes in order to increase physical activity and engagement.
    • Continue to increase opportunities for sensory circuits during the academy day.
  • Increased confidence, knowledge and skills of all staff in teaching PE and sport by:
    • EK and MJC to undertake ‘REAL PE’ and ‘REAL gym’ in order to up-skill their confidence and broaden their knowledge in the delivery of gymnastics and teaching methods of PE.
    • All primary PE teachers to be supported by a Dance company in delivering dance to students focused around the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
  • To increase the number and range of opportunities for primary inter-school competitions.
    • Competing in a range of activities within the local area through ‘Kent School Games’ and ‘Medway Youth Disability Games’.
  • To gain a broader experience of a range of sports and activities offered to all pupils by:
    • Providing additional swimming lessons to all eligible primary students: focused on skill development, sensory needs, self-confidence, socialisation and enjoyment.
  • To raise the profile of PESSPA across the academy as a tool for whole school improvement by:
    • Re-applying for the afPE Quality Mark Award and successfully reviewing and evaluating the quality of PE and Sport in the academy.

 2018-19 Objectives:

  • To achieve the engagement of all pupils in regular physical activity – Chief Medical Officer guidelines recommend that primary school children undertake at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day in school by:
    • Introducing daily ‘6 lap challenge’ to establish an active start to the Morning.
    • Further developing ‘active’ playtimes at break and lunchtimes in order to increase physical activity and engagement
    • Increasing opportunities for sensory circuits during the academy day.
  • To raise the profile of PESSPA across the school as a tool for whole school improvement by:
    • Re-applying for the afPE Quality Mark Award and successfully reviewing and evaluating the quality of PE and Sport in school.
  • Increased confidence, knowledge and skills of all staff in teaching PE and sport by:
    • LBI and EH to undertake ‘Yoga at School’ training in order to up-skill their own confidence, knowledge and understanding of the delivery of yoga within a PE setting
    • Reviewing current teaching style delivered to primary classes and those transitioning into Y7
  • To gain a broader experience of a range of sports and activities offered to all pupils by:
    • Providing additional swimming lessons to all eligible primary students: focused on skill development, sensory needs, self-confidence, socialisation and enjoyment 

2013-2018 Objectives

2013-14

  • To provide swimming lessons to all eligible students.
  • To provide all students opportunities to experience new sporting activities such as Skiing.
  • To provide professional development opportunities in identified areas (including dance).
  • To purchase specialist equipment and teaching resources to develop dance and gymnastics.

2014-15

  • To continue to provide Swimming lessons, Cycling, Skiing, Martial Arts and Trampolining opportunities.
  • To provide teaching staff opportunities to work alongside specialist coaches and further develop their PE/sport specific knowledge which will enable staff to further develop the range of activities on offer within academy based lessons.
  • To develop and establish links with external local clubs that provide opportunities for students beyond the academy day.
  • To develop links with other schools/academies and provides to increase the opportunities for inter-school/academies PE and Sport competitions.

2015-16

  • To ensure all students develop and maintain healthy lifestyles
  • To develop and improve the quality and breath of PE and school/academy sport
  • To raise attainment in PE
  • To increase overall participation rates in PE and school/academy sport

2016-17:

  • To further the engagement in additional Competitions and Sporting events.
  • To further the links with local schools/academies.
  • To further CPD to ensure all Primary PE lessons are Outstanding.

2017-18:

  • To provide additional swimming lessons to all eligible primary students (skill development and physical activity; sensory needs, self-confidence, socialisation and enjoyment).
  • To provide professional development opportunities in identified areas to develop the teaching of primary PE.
  • To provide all eligible primary students opportunities to experience new PE and cross curricular activities (e.g. horse riding).
  • To seek support from a range of external agencies in order to maintain an up to date knowledge of developments in primary PE.
  • To increase the number and range of opportunities for primary inter-school competitions.
  • To access CPD and purchase specialist equipment and teaching resources to develop intervention programmes (sensory circuits, yoga).
  • To develop the range of physical activity engagement opportunities outside curriculum PE (including break times).
  • To further engage parents and carers in accessing physical activity opportunities.
  • To develop Forest Schools work and introduce Beach Schools programme (outdoor play and learning).

Deployment of Funding

To date this funding has been used to provide students in primary with access to swimming, trampolining, Martial Arts and cycling lessons. In addition KS2 students have also accessed Skiing lessons.  New resources have been purchased and staff have accessed specific CPD in order to further raise the quality of teaching and learning in PE lessons, this had led to increased student progression within PE.

Impact of Funding

Please see the below document for specific impact of funding on students confidence, skills and progress within PE.

Primary PE and Sport Premium July 2020.pdf

Pupil Premium Funding 

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

This statement details our academy’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged students.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our academy.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Bradfields Academy

Number of students in school

343

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible students

41%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/22 to 2023/24

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

December 2022

Statement authorised by

Marie Sweetlove

Pupil premium lead

Elizabeth Halton

Vice Principal

Governor / Trustee lead

Peter Martin

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£119,495

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£34,800

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£154,295

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Our curriculum is based around distinct pathways which: 

  • Promote individual and personalised development of academic potential and the ability to transfer those skills to everyday life, work and career opportunities. 
  • Encourage all individuals to thrive, learn and achieve, to feel happy, safe and supported, 
  • Promote a healthy lifestyle, care for each other, celebration of success, and the ability to work through difficulties; within and beyond into the wider community. 
  • Develop strength of character and promotes the resilience needed to make the most of life that lies ahead.  

As an SEND provision, all of our students are considered vulnerable and as such, this is our intent for all students regardless of their background or the challenges they face.  The activities we have outlined in this statement are intended to support the needs of all, regardless of whether they are disadvantaged or not.

High-quality teaching is at the heart of our approach, with a focus on areas in which students require the most support. This is proven to have the greatest impact on closing the disadvantage attainment gap.  Our data suggests that the attainment gap is not significant and so will at the same time benefit all students in our academy.  Implicit in the intended outcomes detailed below, is the intention that all student’s attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their Pupil Premium (PP) peers.

Our strategy is also integral to wider academy plans for education recovery, for students whose education has been worst affected by the pandemic.

Our approach will be responsive to common challenges and individual needs, rooted in robust diagnostic assessment, not assumptions about the impact of disadvantage. The approaches we have adopted complement each other to help all students excel. To ensure they are effective we will:

  • Ensure disadvantaged students are challenged in the work that they are set
  • Act early to intervene at the point need is identified
  • Adopt a whole academy approach in which all staff take responsibility for disadvantaged students’ outcomes and raise expectations of what they can achieve

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Our attendance data for 2020-2021 show no significant difference between Pupil Premium (PP) and the rest of the cohort.  91.57% compared to 92.37%. 

However, 100% of the PP students fell into the persistent Absence category (attendance less than 90%).  This would indicate that Persistent Absence for this group is a limiting factor that could negatively effect of progress.  However, this may be due to Covid and regular monitoring will need to take place to ensure this is a genuine continuing factor. 

2

In 2020-21, the whole academy ratio of average behaviour points per student to average achievement points per student was 1.49:5.92 which is 1:3.97 approximately 1:4.  For PP students the figures are 2.55:5.83 which is 1:2.29 approximately 1:2.  These figures indicate that conduct could be a barrier to learning and progress for PP students.

Across the whole academy, 101 out of 320 students (31.6%) have behaviour points. In the case of PP students, 51 out of 118 students (43.2%) have behaviour points.  This is significantly higher.

For the whole academy 285 out of 320 students (89%) have achievement points and for PP students 104 out of 118 students (88%). These figures are similar; however, the average points per student indicate that on average students in the PP category achieve fewer achievement points than those in the entire academy.

In conclusion, we can see that a bigger percentage of students in the PP group gain behaviour points and in turn, students on average have more behaviour points.

3

Internal assessments indicate that at primary level PP students for English and Science are on average achieving slightly above expected progress. For maths, they are achieving above expected progress.

At KS3 maths performance for PP students is significantly below that of the rest of the cohort, English is slightly lower than the rest of the cohort. 

At KS4 English and maths performance is still below that of the rest of the cohort.

4

Our assessments and observations indicate that the education and wellbeing of many of our students, including PP students have been impacted by academy closures during the pandemic.  This was further exacerbated, as many of the students could not access home learning due to need and not able to blur home and school.   These findings are supported by national studies.

This has resulted in significant knowledge gaps leading to students falling further behind age-related expectations. 

5

Our assessments, observations and discussions with students and families have identified social and emotional issues for many students.  Social isolation and a lack of enrichment opportunities due to social deprivation of our families is a contributing factor.  These challenges particularly affect disadvantaged students, including their attainment.  These finding are supported by national studies. 

Referrals for therapy have markedly increased during the pandemic. 54 current PP students are known to the therapy team.  This represents 39% of the PP cohort.  Of that 19 are currently receiving therapy and 22 are on the waiting list.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all students, particularly our Pupil Premium (PP) students.

Sustained high attendance from 2021/22 demonstrated by:

  • The overall absence rate for all students being no more than 5%
  • The percentage of all students who are persistently absent being below 20% and the figure among PP students being no more than 10% lower than their peers.

To achieve and sustain improved behaviour outcomes for all students, particularly PP students.

Sustain a lower rate of behaviour points for all students year on year up to an including 2023/24 and the average behaviour point to average achievement point for all students is 1:4

Improved attainment in maths and English at both KS3 and KS4 for PP students

KS3 and KS4 maths and English outcomes in 2023/24 show that all PP students are making expected progress in relation to their baseline data

 

Reduce the impact of Covid on the knowledge gap of all students particularly the PP students

All PP students who are eligible will have access to online learning in the home should we go into lockdown, and access full remote learning or blended learning.

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all students in our academy, particularly our PP students.

Sustained high levels of wellbeing from 2023/24 demonstrated by:

  • Qualitative data from student voice, student and parent surveys and teacher observations
  • A significant increase in participation in enrichment activities, particularly among PP students   
 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £30,800

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Purchase of standardised diagnostic assessments.

Training for staff to ensure assessments are interpreted and administered correctly.

Standardised tests can provide reliable insights into the specific strengths and weaknesses of each student to help ensure they receive the correct additional support through interventions or teacher instruction

Diagnostic_Assessment_Tool.pdf

3,4

Embedding dialogic activities across the academy curriculum. These can support students to articulate key ideas, consolidate understanding and extend vocabulary.

We will purchase resources and fund ongoing teacher training and release time.

There is a strong evidence base that suggests oral language interventions, including dialogic activities such as high-quality classroom discussion, are inexpensive to implement with high impacts on reading:

Oral language interventions | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

3,4

Enhancement of our maths teaching and curriculum planning in line with DfE and EEF guidance.

We will fund teacher release time to embed key elements of guidance in the academy and to access maths resources and CPD (including Teaching for Mastery training).

The DfE non-statutory guidance has been produced in conjunction with the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics, drawing on evidence-based approaches:

Maths_guidance_KS_1_and_2.pdf (publishing.service.gov.uk)

The EEF guidance is based on a range of the best available evidence:

Improving Mathematics in Key Stages 2 and 3
3,4

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £46,200

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Metacognition and self-regulation approaches to teaching

There is some evidence to suggest that disadvantaged students are less likely to use metacognitive and self-regulatory strategies without being explicitly taught these strategies. Explicit teaching of metacognitive and self-regulatory strategies could therefore encourage such students to practise and use these skills more frequently in the future. With explicit teaching and feedback, students are more likely to use these strategies independently and habitually, enabling them to manage their own learning and overcome challenges themselves in the future.

Metacognition and self-regulation | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

4

Engaging with the National Tutoring Programme to provide a blend of tuition, mentoring and academy-led tutoring for students whose education has been most impacted by the pandemic.

Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining students or those falling behind, both one-to-one:

One to one tuition | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

and in small groups:

Small group tuition | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

4

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £77,100

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Whole staff CPD on BATL and behaviour management including team Teach and de-escalation techniques with the aim of further embedding the academy ethos and improving behaviour across the academy.

Both targeted interventions and universal approaches can have positive overall effects:

Behaviour interventions | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

2

Embedding principles of good practice set out in the DfE’s Improving school attendance: support for schools and local authorities - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

Training for staff links to BATL expectations around attitude to learning.  Continued support of SEAAS.

The DfE guidance has been informed by engagement with schools that have significantly reduced levels of absence and persistent absence.

1

Extend current provision of therapy service available to students

Provide ‘low level’ therapeutic support through interventions such as friendship groups therefore relieving some of the pressure on waiting lists which can then focus on students with higher level needs.

5

Extend current provision for Parents and Carer Partnership

When restrictions allow provide parental support groups for parenting students with autism, ADHD, etc.

5

Total budgeted cost: £154,100

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Although exam results show that Pupil Premium (PP) students are performing in line with

their peers, examination of internal assessment would show some deficit in some subjects. 

Significantly this is:

  • At KS3 English, all humanity subjects apart from RE and maths

  • At KS4 English, Maths PSHCE and science

Our assessment of the reasons for these outcomes points primarily to Covid-19 impact, which disrupted all our subject areas to varying degrees. As evidenced in schools across the country, academy closure was most detrimental to disadvantaged students, and they were not able to benefit from our pupil premium funded improvements to teaching and targeted interventions to the degree we had intended. The impact was mitigated by our resolution to maintain a high quality curriculum, including during periods of partial closure, which was aided by use of online resources.

Attendance

In 2020-21 the following gauge charts show:

Whole academy attendance                            Pupil Premium Students

Considering the relatively small numbers of students that we have, there are no significant differences in the attendance patterns above.

Persistent Absence

Due to the COVID pandemic the PA figures for the whole academy are high. Bradfields had 315 out of 320 students have an attendance that fell to below 90% by the end of the year. This is 98.43%.

Whole academy PA                                             Pupil Premium PA

  

100% of the 118 PP students fell into the Persistent Absence category. This could be seen as a barrier to learning, however, this equally could have been influenced by the pandemic.

Our assessments and observations indicated that student, wellbeing and mental health were significantly impacted last year, primarily due to COVID-19-related issues. The impact was particularly acute for pupil premium students. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all students, and targeted interventions where required. We are building on that approach with the activities detailed in this plan

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

IXL subscription

Online subscription

Times Tables Rock Stars subscription

Online subscription

Education City subscription

Online subscription

Beanstalk Reading Mentors

Coram Beanstalk

Busters Book Club

Kent Messenger

Service pupil premium funding (optional)

We do not currently receive any Service Pupil Premium.

Measure

Details

How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?

N/A

What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?

N/A

Further information (optional)

In addition to the interventions detailed above, Pupil Premium money has also been used for, and will continue to be used to

  • Employ high levels of staff in each class to meet individual needs
  • Establish and maintain a wider pastoral support provision deemed by OFSTED and other external agencies as exemplar
  • Provide targeted support for students in developing communication and social skills
  • Provide English examination support by supporting the cost of external exam text based workshops.
  • Provide welfare support for families during the lockdown period, by funding extra therapeutic hours so that students could access these remotely or in the academy.
  • Utilising a DfE grant to train a senior mental health lead. The training we have selected will focus on the training needs identified through the online tool: to develop our understanding of our students’ needs, give students a voice in how we address wellbeing, and support more effective collaboration with parents.
  • Offering a wide range of high-quality extracurricular activities to boost wellbeing, behaviour, attendance, and aspiration. Activities will focus on building life skills such as confidence, resilience, and socialising. Disadvantaged students will be encouraged and supported to participate.

Planning, implementation, and evaluation

In planning our new pupil premium strategy, we evaluated why activity undertaken in previous years had not had the degree of impact that we had expected.

We triangulated evidence from multiple sources of data including assessments, engagement in class book scrutiny, conversations with parents, students and teachers in order to identify the challenges faced by disadvantaged students. We also used the EEF’s families of schools database to view the performance of disadvantaged students in schools similar to ours and contacted schools with high-performing disadvantaged students to learn from their approach.

We looked at a number of reports, studies and research papers about effective use of pupil premium, the impact of disadvantage on education outcomes and how to address challenges to learning presented by socio-economic disadvantage. We also looked at studies about the impact of the pandemic on disadvantaged students.

We used the EEF’s implementation guidance to help us develop our strategy, particularly the ‘explore’ phase to help us diagnose specific student needs and work out which activities and approaches are likely to work in our academy. We will continue to use it through the implementation of activities.

We have put a robust evaluation framework in place for the duration of our three-year approach and will adjust our plan over time to secure better outcomes for students.

Please see the below document for more information:

Pupil Premium – Statement 2021

Year 7 Catch-Up Funding 

Year 7 Literacy & Numeracy Catch-Up Funding

The Department for Education (DfE) provided additional funding for all students in Year 7 from 2012 onwards, who achieved below their age related expectations at the end of KS2. This additional funding is to be used by schools/academies to provide literacy and numeracy catch-up support for Year 7 students. It is designed to help students catch up as quickly as possible. In the case of our cohorts it is to be used to boost rates of progress as opposed to expectations for increasing attainment to age related in light of specific learning needs.

Academy Context

Number of students and Catch-Up Premium received

Total number of students on roll 2019-20

312

Total number of students eligible for catch-up premium funding

according to ESFA publication March 2019

35: 2012 -13

30: 2013-14

34: 2014-15

35: 2015-16

37: 2016-17

35: 2017-18

37: 2018-19

50: 2019-20

Amount of catch-up premium funding received per student

£471.44 per student

Total amount of Catch-Up Premium funding received £23,572
Total Spent £22,240.90

Our Aims:

At Bradfields the Catch Up funding is being used to work towards achieving the following aims:

2019-2020 Objectives:

  1. To extend the number of students supported by the Beanstalk Reading Mentors
  2. To provide resources for the SCERTS Classrooms to develop their literacy and numeracy delivery.
  3. To continue to promote collaboration between literacy and numeracy in sharing good practice.
  4. To continue to ensure that literacy and numeracy are promoted in all subjects. This will be done as part of the Department Monitoring and Reviews.
  5. To develop the notion of Reading for Life, by ensuring inference and comprehension skills are inked to all reading, and encourage reading in the community i.e. menus, timetables etc.
  6. Enter strategies into the KM Literacy Awards.
  7. To continue a constant review of resources within English and maths to support literacy and numeracy.
  8. To compliment learning with good quality external support for literacy and numeracy.
  9. Embed a passion for literacy and numeracy.

Previously at Bradfields the funding has enabled us to achieve the following aims:

Previous Objectives 

2012-13 Objectives :

  • To raise attainment in reading age.
  • To encourage students to develop a love of reading.
  • To narrow the gap between boys and girls progress in Maths.

2013-14

  • To raise attainment in reading and writing.
  • To develop level of comprehension.
  • To develop fine motor skills to impact on quality of hand writing.
  • To further narrow the gap between boys and girls progress in Maths and English. 

2014-15

  • To continue to increase reading skills and achievement.
  • To focus on writing – particularly letter formation, sentence structures and punctuation.
  • To improve comprehension skills and the ability to infer.
  • To develop an even greater range of different resources and interventions to further support students.

2015-16

  • To further build upon success with reading in 2015-16
  • To look to refine tracking system for targeted interventions
  • To develop whole academy handwriting programme
  • To combine with Pupil Premium targeting to develop strategies to enhance reading comprehension skills and the ability to infer.
  • To focus on literacy strategies to support more complex Programme 1 students.
  • To work towards achieving the Kent Literacy Award for initiatives.
  • To further raise whole academy literacy and numeracy awareness and cross-curricular approach.

2016-17

  • To further build upon success with reading in 2015-16.
  • To look to refine the tracking system for targeted interventions.
  • To develop whole academy handwriting programme
  • To combine with Pupil Premium targeting to develop strategies to enhance reading comprehension skills and the ability to infer.
  • To focus on literacy strategies to support the more complex Programme 1 group of students.
  • To work towards achieving the Kent Literacy Award for initiatives.
  • To further raise whole academy literacy and numeracy awareness.

2017-18 Objectives:

  • To further develop the students’ positive attitudes to reading by maintaining and extending the number of reading mentors available within the academy.
  • To extend the previous year’s aim of refining tracking systems by fully incorporating the Interventions module in SIMS. This will allow for tracking of impact and cost.
  • To implement the handwriting programme throughout Year 7 and further years within the academy by ensuring that all relevant teachers/zones have the necessary resources.
  • To continue to combine with Pupil Premium (for LAC students in their PEPs) to develop ‘Reading For Life’ by ensuring that inference and comprehension skills are linked to all reading.
  • To continue to work within the Kent Literacy Awards framework and investigate a numeracy equivalent.
  • To continue to raise literacy and numeracy profiles across the curriculum by ensuring that lesson plan monitoring, work scrutiny, lesson observations and department reviews identify and celebrate it.
  • To review and improve the literacy and numeracy resources, such as IXL, Numicon, and the Accelerated packages.
  • To continue to support the developments in reading by maintaining and where appropriate extending the number of reading mentors within the academy.
  • To incorporate more practical numeracy to the department to assist the students with their passion for the subjects.
  • To fully utilise the new numeracy intervention co-ordinator by creating targeted groups in mathematics and numeracy for her to support.
  • To ensure that both literacy and numeracy are supported through the Department Review Process, within maths and English as well as other subjects.
  • To transfer all Catch-up tracking to the Mark Sheets in SIMS
  •  To continue to combine with Pupil Premium (for LAC students in their PEPs) to develop ‘Reading For Life’ by ensuring that inference and comprehension skills are linked to all reading.
  • To continue to work within the Kent Literacy Awards framework and commence work in a numeracy equivalent scheme.
  • To continue to review and improve resources within both departments
  • To continue to seek out good quality external support for literacy and numeracy to compliment the work within the academy.

2018-19 Objectives:

  1. To continue to support the developments in reading by maintaining and where appropriate extending the number of reading mentors within the academy.
  2. To incorporate more practical numeracy to the department to assist the students with their passion for the subjects.
  3. To fully utilise the new numeracy intervention co-ordinator and TA by creating targeted groups in mathematics and numeracy for them to support. Maintain the work with the Literacy coordinator and TAs.
  4. To ensure that both literacy and numeracy are supported through the Department Review Process, within maths and English as well as other subjects.
  5. To transfer all Catch-up tracking to the Mark Sheets in SIMS
  6. To continue to combine with Pupil Premium (for LAC students in their PEPs) to develop ‘Reading for Life’ by ensuring that inference and comprehension skills are linked to all reading.
  7. To continue to work within the Kent Literacy Awards framework and commence work in a numeracy equivalent scheme.
  8. To continue to review and improve resources within both departments
  9. To continue to seek out good quality external support for literacy and numeracy to compliment the work within the academy.
  10. To further develop a student passion for literacy and numeracy.

Deployment of Funding

Specifically this has involved targeting individual literacy and numeracy needs through specialist led interventions provided in either 1:1 or small groups to support the development of a range of skills including: fine and gross motor skills development; letter recognition, writing sentences; organising ideas in writing; and, early literacy.

The funding has also been used to develop Year 7 students’ interest and development in their writing skills, storytelling and reading. We have also further built upon existing reading provisions and widened the range of books available for Home Learning. A key numeracy focus has been on increasing access to online resources both in our academy and for students at home which is designed to further develop and build upon their existing skills, knowledge and understanding through a personalised route. This has proved very successful with the students and has had a positive impact on students’ progress within Maths.

For 2014-15, we further built upon the success of our literacy and numeracy drive. For literacy we focused on reading for pleasure in collaboration with the Busters Book Club Scheme, Kent Messenger and the development of writing through collaborating with Pop UP Projects (http://pop-up.org.uk/) which provided students with an opportunity to work with authors to produce their own written pieces and share their success with academy community. For Numeracy we further developed the range of specific targeted intervention sessions and opportunities for numeracy based enrichment workshops.

The new Bradfields Library was also opened which has further enhanced the range of reading texts available and through greater use of technology we have increased the access to and use of e-books and apps.

Bradfields Academy was awarded the Busters Book Club Gold Literacy Mark (2014-15), in recognition of our impact in raising students and parents/carers engagement in reading. Only nine schools/academies across Medway received this award.

For 2015-16, we further built upon our successes with reading which was recognised through the Busters Book Club Platinum Literacy Mark. We also developed a whole academy handwriting focus and have combined with Pupil Premium targeting to develop strategies to enhance reading comprehension skills and the ability to infer, this work was recognised through gaining the Kent Literacy Award for the Most Inclusive Interventions across Medway.

Within the 2017-18 academic year strategies that had been trialled in English were undertaken by the mathematics department to further boost the performance in numeracy. These proved successful.

For 2018-2019 the interventions for numeracy were maintained and extended. Both departments further invested in technology to support the students. The mathematics department also began to undertake developmental work around comprehension within the department. The specific targets were:

  1. To continue to support the developments in reading by maintaining and where appropriate extending the number of reading mentors within the academy.
  2. To incorporate more practical numeracy to the department to assist the students with their passion for the subjects.
  3. To fully utilise the new numeracy intervention co-ordinator and TA by creating targeted groups in mathematics and numeracy for them to support. Maintain the work with the Literacy coordinator and TAs.
  4. To ensure that both literacy and numeracy are supported through the Department Review Process, within maths and English as well as other subjects.
  5. To transfer all Catch-up tracking to the Mark Sheets in SIMS
  6. To continue to combine with Pupil Premium (for LAC students in their PEPs) to develop ‘Reading for Life’ by ensuring that inference and comprehension skills are linked to all reading.
  7. To continue to work within the Kent Literacy Awards framework and commence work in a numeracy equivalent scheme.
  8. To continue to review and improve resources within both departments
  9. To continue to seek out good quality external support for literacy and numeracy to compliment the work within the academy.
  10. To further develop a student passion for literacy and numeracy.

In 2019 – 2020 The aim of the Catch-Up funding was to enhance the literacy and numeracy input into the complex communities where they are taught by need specialists rather than subject specialists. In addition to this developing whole school strategies that support students in developing basic skills in mental arithmetic and creative writing. This academic year was cut short due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Impact of Funding

  • Students have a pride in their new equipment and begin to see a link with numeracy in other subjects rather than just in mathematics
  • All Bradfields’ students arrive with a delayed reading ability. The creation of a reading corner has instilled passion for the subject and a desire from students to improve their skills. This has not just been in Year 7.
  • Resources in all rooms support delivery of literacy and numeracy.
  • Students accessed the online scheme to read. More students are logging their progress.
  • Students have access to a wealth of books through the Kindles and those that require visual support can access this. It also allows for multiple copies of texts across devices.  Many younger students are adverse to books as they have not had a good experience with them.
  • The academy has had great success in the number of reading minutes logged by students and has received numerous awards from the KM for their innovative work.
  • Students are passionate about reading to their mentor. They look forward to sessions, and are pleased to demonstrate their progress.
  • Practical activities for students in solving puzzles. Students motivated to join in and solve problems.
  • Identified students targeted. They have enjoyed the intervention work and their progress is now ‘on track’.
  • Identified students targeted. They have enjoyed the intervention work and their progress is now ‘on track’.
  • Students readily engage in the weekly handwriting challenge. Students receive Penmanship Awards.
  • This scheme is where established authors come in and workshop with our students.

For more specific examples of intervention impact please see the attached report.

Future Deployment

2019- 2020 as an unusual academic year as formal education ceased at Easter. A number of spends had been identified and committed to prior to lockdown and these will be realised in this academic year. For example, the Pop Up Authors will attend when a Covid19 Safe strategy is in place to enable to do this, either face to face or remotely.

It has been announced that the Catch-up funding will not be in this format for the academic year 2020-2021. We await firm details as to the funding and to how it can be spent.

There will be a need in this year to replace a numeracy TA.

Please see the below document for more information:

Catch Up Funding October 2020.pdf

Please note, this grant was discontinued and replaced with the Covid Catch-Up strategy.